Bates34-9T

OverviewTranscribeVersionsHelp

Facsimile

Transcription

Status: Complete

34/9
5
or used at the dances. Every ornament is either destroyed or hidden after the dance is over, for should women or children touch them at any time, they would at once become ill. They can look at the ornaments during the dance, and while they are being worn, but not at any other time.
While the decorations were being made, the ground chosen for the Doordaaroo was marked out, levelled and cleared of every root, shrub or twig, a soft flat surface with a background of trees being almost always chosen. The ground was arranged in a broken circle one half of which formed the stage, the other half constituting the auditorium. A path ran through the centre of the circle, and at either end of the path, about two yards from the circle, a "green room" formed of boughs and saplings was erected for the dancers. The shelter where the ornaments were made was also the dressing room and was some little distance from the green rooms.
At one or both ends of the path a fire of dried boughs and quick burning wood was placed, with a reserve heap just beyond the circle.
Brothers-in-law generally helped each other in the decoration of their persons, painting the back, arms and legs in various designs but most of the personal ornaments represented the individual taste as well as the personal possessions of the wearers. It was remarkable to note that when a design which had been made by a native on his breast and shoulders was carried out by his brother-in-law, the lines, dots and other markings on his back and legs exactly followed the design in front and looked when finished as though the whole painting had been done by the same person, so faithfully was the design copied.
The music of the Doordaaroo was supplied by two musicians who each held a pair of kailees caught in the middle, the ends being clacked together after the manner of the "bones” at a minstrel entertainment. The musicians placed themselves near one of the entrances to the circle not far from the fire, the fire tender stood to right or left of the fire, and the audience seated themselves round the "auditorium." The musicians are also the singers

Notes and Questions

Nobody has written a note for this page yet

Please sign in to write a note for this page